Prometheus Engineer language in updated alternative version of A Grammar of Modern Indo-European

As we announced yesterday at Dnghu, our book A Grammar of Modern Indo-European, Third Edition has been revised, and the new version of the Proto-Indo-European lexicon has been added and it is available now online and printed at Amazon, without the Etymology section – it is therefore a cheaper, more handy manual.

But, more importantly, we have added a new section and published a parallel Prometheus Edition – Engineer language of the grammar, that includes unprecedented content with discussion of Prometheus’ recreated Late Proto-Indo-European dialect of the Prometheus/Alien/Predator fiction universe. There is also a printed version at Amazon. As you probably know already, our grammar is a Late Indo-European dialectal grammar, so it wasn’t difficult to add some information on ‘Engineer’ for fans.

We have opened a blog dedicated to the language, and a new dedicated section in our forum for discussion on this recreated language, and on the universe shared by Alien, Predator, Alien vs. Predator, and now also Prometheus franchises.

In my opinion, given the dialectal nature of the language as we know it now, the richness of the reconstruction on which it is based, and the specialized group that Ridley Scott contacted to work on it, it could be the most interesting conlang ever – or reclang, since it is recreated from a reconstruction…

Welcome back!

I have been trying to minimize contact with my own blogs, due to the huge amount of projects that I had – online as well as offline -, and the time-wasting nature of the dozen blogs I installed back in 2006-2009. They were (like this one) little more than dialectic in nature, with no particular aim.

Right now I am tired of developing new ideas without publicizing them. I think I have information on some fields where other people might be interested in, and projects whose development could be interesting to share.

For the moment, I have changed the WordPress theme to allow for an easy reading with smartphones and tablets.

Welcome back to all subscribers!

New Edition of “A Grammar of Modern Indo-European” Published

A new full-revised version of Dnghu‘s main book, A Grammar of Modern Indo-European, Third Edition, has been published.

Details on the revision are found at the Indo-European Linguistics blog.

Information on this major release and all subsequent changes will be published at Dnghu’s site on Indo-European Language Grammar. Files containing Proto-Indo-European vocabulary will be found at the Proto-Indo-European lexicon‘s site.

If you like the files, please recommend them to your friends in your social networks!

The official site where all newest version’s files and formats published should be found will be from now on indo-european.info.

Enjoy!

How to Fix a MySQL Character Encoding Mismatch in WordPress

An upgrade to a newer WordPress version, or (as in my case) to a newer version of MySQL, might trigger a problem which has been described since version 2.2: old UTF-8 characters are then represented by strange characters, say “é” will appear instead of “é”.

After reading some posts (e.g. this or this one) about how to fix it, I decided to solve it using one of the simple plugins out there. I tried both, UTF-8 Database converter and WP Sanitize Plugin.

But they just converted the database encoding the simple way. Which was fine, since I don’t care about non-European characters that much. However, there were still a lot of obvious character encoding errors, because the binary encoding was still wrong in many cases.

So I made multiple SQL queries to replace the wrong characters by their correct counterparts, and there it is: I fixed it without using the Shell commands of the aforementioned posts.

If you have the same problem, it will take you seconds to fix your character encoding issue, after having used one of the plugins above (say, UTF-8 Sanitize) and followed its instructions. Then execute the following SQL queries within your blog’s database:

Beware!

  1. Do not change the position of the last query: it should remain the last one.
  2. In that last query, for the wrong character “Ô, you have to choose which of these characters you want it substituted for: “à” (default, preferred if you write mostly in French), “Á”, “í”, “Í” (probably better choices for Spanish blogs), or even “Ï” or “Ý”.

I know, I know, it’s not a perfect solution – but it was indeed easier for me…

WordPress Translation plugin errors corrected – version 1.6.1, now with Google Translate Menu

The latest WordPress Translate Plugin released (1.6) showed an error in the website address conversion. It has been corrected, and a new version 1.6.1 has been released for those languages that had already the plugin with versions 1.5 and 1.6.

Also, a Google Translate Menu version has been included in the plugin package, along with the horizontal and vertical versions. Its output is similar to the one offered by Google, but without the Google style, logos and links, so that it is fully customizable for your blog’s theme. You can see the output of the Translate Menu at the Spanish version of this blog.

Please remember that the IndoEuropean Translator Widget for WordPress is more easily installed, that – unlike this plugin – it includes translation from and into all language pairs offered by Google Translate, and that it also includes all versions offered with this plugin – horizontal, vertical and menu.

The dnghu.php plugin is just a simple code, for those who know some HTML, PHP and/or CSS, who are able to modify the WordPress files, and who want to make the Translation Plugin fit perfectly into their theme.

A Grammar of Modern Indo-European, Second Edition, published online, and its printed version available at Amazon

The latest version of A Grammar of Modern Indo-European, version 4, Second Printed Edition, was published online some days ago. It includes a lot of minor corrections, new examples and sections, and hundreds of pages of Indo-European words and their etymology. It is – as always – licensed under a dual CC-by-sa and GNU FDL.

It has been eventually approved for its printed version at Amazon, and is now available for purchase. The general features of the printed edition are as follows:

  • Page Count: 824
  • Price: 19.99$
  • Binding Type: US Trade Paper
  • Trim Size: 7″ x 10″
  • Language: English
  • Color: Black and White

It is highly recommended to replace older versions of the ebook with version 4 or newer, as it entered a stable version of the language system.

The web page of the grammar offers the book in different formats, to download or read online